Judge denies MTA’s request for stay – says allowing the Purple Line to go forward without a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement is not in the public interest

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In his order and opinion memorandum issued June 26, Federal Judge Richard Leon denied the Maryland Transit Administration (MTA)’s request to let the Purple Line project go forward and construction begin, even though issues remain unresolved in court and the MTA and FTA have not undertaken the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement required by the Court.

Harmful Purple Line Should Remain Suspended While Legality Remains in Question, Says Friends of the Capital Crescent Trail in its Response Memorandum

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Friends of the Capital Crescent Trail, in its court filing on June 8, requested that in order to avoid irreversible injury to the public, the Purple Line remain suspended while the courts ensure that the agencies undertake the steps necessary to comply with the law and protect the public to the full extent of the… Read more »

Maryland’s petition for Writ of Mandamus is now moot and could not in any case be justified, says Friends of the Capital Crescent Trail in new filing

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Posted May 24.  The judge’s ruling on May 22 renders moot Maryland’s petition for a Writ of Mandamus, and, in any case, Maryland’s petition was unjustifiable because the injury that Maryland asserts it suffers is in fact entirely self-inflicted, said Friends of the Capital Crescent Trail and co-plaintiffs in their May 23 filing to the… Read more »

FTA and MTA continue to dodge critical Purple Line questions, says Friends of the Capital Crescent Trail in court filing

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The common sense challenge to the $5.6 billion Purple Line light rail project continues in Federal District Court, as the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) and Maryland Transit Administration (MTA) were called out for refusing to conduct an objective assessment and continuing their faulty interpretation of regulatory requirements. In their filing of January 5, 2017, Friends… Read more »